?

Log in

No account? Create an account
SF book meme - Synchronicity swirls and other foolishness

> Recent Entries
> Archive
> Friends
> Profile
> my rpg writing site

November 14th, 2006


Previous Entry Share Next Entry
06:04 pm - SF book meme
This is a list of the 50 most significant science fiction/fantasy novels, 1953-2002, according to the Science Fiction Book Club. Bold the ones you've read, strike-out the ones you hated, italicize those you started but never finished and put an asterisk beside the ones you loved. Before listing my results, I must say that I'm somewhat unimpressed with the list, the total of Andre Norton, C.L. Moore, or the other early female SF authors, or for that matter the total lack of C.J. Cherryh's work is disappointing. Also, despite loathing everything of his that I've seen, I can understand putting Terry Pratchett on this list, but Terry Brooks - putting The Sword of Shannara, while leaving off Cyteen and some of Cherryh's other excellent work is utterly baffling, as is the lack of anything by Iain M. Banks. Also, as far as mentioning books that I loved, I'm basing that on my reaction when I read the book, or when I most recently reread it, and in some cases this was 30+ years ago.

1. The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien
2. The Foundation Trilogy, Isaac Asimov
3. Dune, Frank Herbert
4. Stranger in a Strange Land, Robert A. Heinlein
5. A Wizard of Earthsea, Ursula K. Le Guin*
6. Neuromancer, William Gibson*
7. Childhood's End, Arthur C. Clarke*

8. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, Philip K. Dick
9. The Mists of Avalon, Marion Zimmer Bradley
10. Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury
11. The Book of the New Sun, Gene Wolfe

12. A Canticle for Leibowitz, Walter M. Miller, Jr.
13. The Caves of Steel, Isaac Asimov
14. Children of the Atom, Wilmar Shiras?
15. Cities in Flight, James Blish
16. The Colour of Magic, Terry Pratchett?
17. Dangerous Visions, edited by Harlan Ellison
18. Deathbird Stories, Harlan Ellison
19. The Demolished Man, Alfred Bester

20. Dhalgren, Samuel R. Delany
21. Dragonflight, Anne McCaffrey*
22. Ender's Game, Orson Scott Card
23. The First Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever, Stephen R. Donaldson
24. The Forever War, Joe Haldeman
25. Gateway, Frederik Pohl

26. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, J.K. Rowling
27. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams
28. I Am Legend, Richard Matheson
29. Interview with the Vampire, Anne Rice
30. The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula K. Le Guin

31. Little, Big, John Crowley
32. Lord of Light, Roger Zelazny*
33. The Man in the High Castle, Philip K. Dick
34. Mission of Gravity, Hal Clement*
35. More Than Human, Theodore Sturgeon*
36. The Rediscovery of Man, Cordwainer Smith*

37. On the Beach, Nevil Shute
38. Rendezvous with Rama, Arthur C. Clarke*
39. Ringworld, Larry Niven
40. Rogue Moon, Algis Budrys?

41. The Silmarillion, J.R.R. Tolkien
42. Slaughterhouse-5, Kurt Vonnegut
43. Snow Crash, Neal Stephenson
44. Stand on Zanzibar, John Brunner*
45. The Stars My Destination, Alfred Bester*
46. Starship Troopers, Robert A. Heinlein
47. Stormbringer, Michael Moorcock

48. The Sword of Shannara, Terry Brooks
49. Timescape, Gregory Benford
50. To Your Scattered Bodies Go, Philip Jose Farmer?*
Current Mood: amusedamused

(8 comments | Leave a comment)

Comments:


[User Picture]
From:slothman
Date:November 15th, 2006 02:41 am (UTC)
(Link)
What is The Silmarillion doing on there? It’s more of a series bible (almost literally in the beginning parts) giving background to the story of Lord of the Rings; hardly a novel.
[User Picture]
From:heron61
Date:November 15th, 2006 10:20 am (UTC)
(Link)
I completely agree. I have no idea why it is on a list of novels, or for that matter why anyone was that interested in it, but Middle Earth is also definitely no my fandom.
[User Picture]
From:heronheart
Date:November 15th, 2006 03:40 am (UTC)
(Link)
Why do I have the feeling that being on this list mostly has to do with sales/fame?
[User Picture]
From:heron61
Date:November 15th, 2006 10:22 am (UTC)
(Link)
To some extent, but a few like Children of the Atom certainly don't fit that criteria and a great many of them did make a significant impact on the field - both of the Ellison collections, both of LeGuin's, Neuromancer, and quite a number of others were very much transformative works of SF.
[User Picture]
From:queerbychoice
Date:November 15th, 2006 04:08 am (UTC)
(Link)
I've read:

4. Stranger in a Strange Land, Robert A. Heinlein
5. A Wizard of Earthsea, Ursula K. Le Guin
10. Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury
20. Dhalgren, Samuel R. Delany
26. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, J. K. Rowling
27. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams
30. The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula K. Le Guin
38. Rendezvous with Rama, Arthur C. Clarke
42. Slaughterhouse-5, Kurt Vonnegut
45. The Stars My Destination, Alfred Bester

I liked pretty much all of them, except for Robert Heinlein's sexism. But I think I loved Douglas Adams the most.
[User Picture]
From:oneirophrenia
Date:November 15th, 2006 05:17 am (UTC)
(Link)
Jayzus...I've literally read everything on that list. Or, at least, attempted to--I didn't get very far into the Anne McCaffrey. Her writing literally makes me itch it's so unbearably bad.
[User Picture]
From:heron61
Date:November 15th, 2006 09:11 am (UTC)
(Link)
I enjoyed it a lot when I was 14, after that she got worse (The Rowan is one of the most pathetically written pieces of crap ever written) and I became less tolerant of her writing.
[User Picture]
From:kitten_goddess
Date:November 15th, 2006 03:25 pm (UTC)
(Link)
HUH?? What is Anne Rice doing on here? Last time I checked, Interview With The Vampire is horror, not sci-fi.

> Go to Top
LiveJournal.com